How to Choose an Employment Law

If you need an employment law solicitor, then you may already have a firm of solicitors in mind, or you may have never needed legal help before. How can you be sure More »

The Role of an Employment Law

The following article examines the role of an Employment Law Solicitor, the type of work they undertake and the circumstances under which they are needed. History Employment Law came into force in More »

Employment Law Solicitors

If you’ve been involved in a dispute at work, perhaps with a colleague, your boss or an employee, then may be you’ve thought about taking legal action, and are seeking the advice More »

A Guide to British Employment

If you’re an employer or an employee, or even a solicitor, then you may have come across Employment Law.  The following article explains the history of the laws of employment in Britain and More »

Do You Know Your Employer

Being a small business owner is more than a job, it is a way of life. You are on call all hours of the day, night, and weekend to handle issues, fill More »

How to Choose an Employment Law

If you need an employment law solicitor, then you may already have a firm of solicitors in mind, or you may have never needed legal help before. How can you be sure that the employment law solicitor that you choose is the right one for you?

5 tips when choosing an employment law solicitor

1. What employment law experience has the firm of solicitors had?

Choosing a solicitor isn’t easy. There are many to choose from, and a lot of them will offer similar services. Some solicitors will specialise in particular areas of law, such as family law, conveyancing, or commercial law. A firm of solicitors that has considerable experience in employment law, will be able to put you at ease, and reassure you, whether you want help with advertising for new employees, or for a discrimination case.

2. How can your employment law solicitor help you?

The sort of help and advice that you are looking for will determine what sort of employment law solicitor you need. If you

Employment Law Solicitor?

Whether you’re an employer or an employee, there may come a time where legal support or advice will be required. If you’re unclear on how an employment law  can help, this article may help. Here, we look at the different employment situations you might one day face, and how professional legal support could benefit you.

Businesses

Perhaps the most useful support an employment law solicitor can provide is day to day assistance, whereby a retained contract is involved. It allows your business to benefit from ongoing support and advice on a range of issues, minor and major, as and when they arise. This could be everything from how to implement a disciplinary or grievance procedure to managing sickness absences.

Another way businesses can benefit from an employment law solicitor is when TUPE (Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) regulations) come into play. This is where a change in business or service contract ownership results in staff being transferred to the new employers on the same terms and conditions. An employment law solicitor

Standards Make the Baseline of Employments Law

Whether you want to claim a severance or you want your employer to reconsider your termination, you have to consult a law firm that has lawyers with expertise in employment law. Once you are fired off your services you cannot claim anything from your employer unless you follow the proper means. To claim proper compensation or to claim justice, you need to employ an expert from an employment law firm.

The expert hired by you will guide you through the whole process of reclaiming justice. He will make you understand the entire process and what you can claim in compensation. Moreover, the expert you hire should also have proper knowledge of the employment law prevalent in the particular province. Though employment law is almost same in every province and more or less similar law code governs the companies that fall under the jurisdiction of a province; even then there are certain differences.

The highlighting factor is that the common law that governs the employment law in Canada is based on ‘Federal Labor’ standards. These standards make

The Role of an Employment Law

The following article examines the role of an Employment Law Solicitor, the type of work they undertake and the circumstances under which they are needed.

History

Employment Law came into force in Britain during the industrial revolution of the 19th Century. The rise of industrialism meant that workers were increasingly being asked to work longer hours and this led to disputes between factory workers and their employees. As these disputes frequently remained unresolved, LAws covering Employment were introduced in order to protect the interests of workers and ensure that they were not exploited. Employment Law Solicitors came into play as a result of these new laws, in order to fight the case for both employers and employees on employment cases going through the courts.

What is an Employment Law Solicitor?

This type of Solicitor is a legal professional who has been specially trained to deal with issues relating to the legal rights of workers and their employers.

What Does an Employment Law Solicitor Do?

Typically, a Solicitor who specialised in employment will be involved with cases which involve the following aspects of

Employment Law Solicitors

If you’ve been involved in a dispute at work, perhaps with a colleague, your boss or an employee, then may be you’ve thought about taking legal action, and are seeking the advice of an employment law solicitor.

Here’s what you need to know.

1. It’s important to remember that seeking the advice of an employment law solicitor is often the last resort, and only usually happens when discussions or further consultations have failed. It might be hard to stay in your current job if you have accused colleagues or your employer of something serious to need legal action. It also might be hard for you if you have been accused of something.

2. Choose a solicitor that specialises in employment law, rather than one that mainly works in conveyancing, or criminal law.

3. The firm of employment law solicitors you choose should be knowledgeable and sympathetic to your cause, and understand what you’re going through. How can they best represent you, if they don’t know and understand what’s going on?

4. The solicitors you choose will need to be able to

A Guide to British Employment

If you’re an employer or an employee, or even a solicitor, then you may have come across Employment Law.  The following article explains the history of the laws of employment in Britain and the impact of the legislation which has occurred over the years.

British Employment Law – The Industrial Revolution

The British industrial revolution led to the introduction of employment laws in Britain. The reason for this was that, due to the advent of industrialism and use of machinery for the first time, workers were increasingly being asked to work longer and longer hours. The average working day, prior to the revolution was between 11-14 hours, however this had risen, with some workers working as many as 16 hours a day.

British Employment Law – Working Hours

In 1833, a new law on employment hours was passed. This limited miners to no more than 12 hours work a day and children to just 10 hours. In 1848, a further reduction occurred, limiting all workers to just 10 hours.

British Employment Law – The Factory Acts

The Factory

Do You Know Your Employer

Being a small business owner is more than a job, it is a way of life. You are on call all hours of the day, night, and weekend to handle issues, fill in the gaps, and make sure your baby is running smoothly and generating a profit. Yet between managing your clients and your bottom line, is there something you are forgetting to stay updated on? If you don’t know the latest details about employer law, then you are setting up yourself – and all your hard work – for major issues.

Employer law is the government written guidelines for how a business of any size needs to deal with certain issues like maternity leave, employing minors, verifying worker legality, paying for overtime, and providing benefits and wages. While business owners have autonomy handling many aspects of their business, the way they care for and treat their employees is monitored by the government partly to ensure employees are not being mistreated, and partly so they can get their cut.

The tricky part of employer law is that, especially over the past several years, it has been adjusted considerably; meaning just

Employment Law and Equal

The Industrial Revolution has brought radical changes in the working place. This historical phenomenon swept much of the world, especially Europe where it started and the Americas. One radical change it brought to the working place is the deterioration of working conditions as the number of workers or employees rose meteorically. In this regard, the government would need to pass laws protecting the rights of workers. These protective laws paved the way for the creation of modern employment law in the United States.

What is Employment Law?

The Employment Law protects employees or workers from any kind of mistreatment on the workplace. The poor working conditions that resulted from Industrial Revolution led to the creation of laws establishing fair wages, limiting the number of working hours in a week and prohibiting child labor. Other labor related laws also include laws regulating the cleanliness of the workplace, protection of employees from any kind of hazardous accidents.

Employment Laws have been passed standardizing the provision of benefits by the employers for the employees.

Employment Law includes health insurance that benefits workers if medical problems arise due

Need Help With Employment

Many people need advice on employment law when there is an employment issue needing to be resolved such as dismissal and bullying. In these times it is important to locate a firm specialising in this area which can work alongside you, guide you and put in place simple systems and procedures that will allow you to manage tomorrow’s problems.

Employment law requires the employer to provide an employment agreement but it is important for the employer to ensure the employment agreement is tailored to the needs of the business: Any old agreement will not do.

This is an area of law where prevention is better and cheaper than the cure or, to put it another way, it is better to know where you stand before you are standing in it! Personal grievances and claims that the employer unfairly dismissed an employee, failed to investigate a complaint of workplace bullying or stress, or failed to consult the employee about restructuring and the resulting redundancy can be prevented by obtaining good advice on employment law.

If you are a small to medium sized business you are unlikely to have

All Managers Should Attend Employment Law Training

Matt Manager would like to know why he has to attend employment law training. What does employment law have to do with Matt’s job anyway? His job requires him to make sure his employees are being productive and making money. Employment law is HR’s responsibility. Matt has no time or patience for such matters.

Unfortunately, Matt’s conclusion could not be farther from the truth. Now, more than ever Managers need to understand and be familiar with the employment laws because acting within the law, following the company’s policies and avoiding liability are all part and parcel of the manager’s job duties.

Begrudgingly, Matt Manager attends the training class and is pretty shocked by what he learns. The first part of the training deals with hiring and what he can and cannot ask the applicants he interviews. He never knew, for instance, that you could not ask an applicant if they are a US Citizen or ask a female employee if she is married or ask an employee if they are disabled. Who knew?

In fact, in many states the laws prohibit employers from asking questions about citizenship,

Employment Law Is Not Workers

Since employment law and workers’ compensation law both relate to people and their workplace it is common, however incorrect, for the two to be used interchangeably in conversation. Here are the key distinctions between these important areas of the law.

Employment Law is:

  • ADA Violations – The Americans with Disability Act, ADA, prohibits discrimination in the work place based on disability. Employers anywhere in the country, including Washington State, with 15 or more employees must provide individuals with disabilities an equal opportunity to benefit from the full range of employment opportunities available to others.
  • Discrimination – Employers cannot treat employees differently due to race, color, religion, sex, age, disabilities, genetic information or national origin.
  • Employment Contract Disputes – These kinds of disputes involve issues arising from formal employment contracts. These issues typically include non-compete clauses, wages, bonuses, benefits, duration of employment, ownership of intellectual property, and confidentiality.
  • FMLA Violations – Employers with over 15 employees must follow the FMLA which entitles individuals to 12 weeks of unpaid leave if the employee is unable to perform his or her job due to a serious medical condition; needs to care for a sick family member (including spouse, child, or parent); or

A Quick Description of Employment

Employment law (EL) is a system that was set up to protect employees by instituting laws that require standards for employers to follow in the treatment of their employees. This can include providing benefits to the workers such as health insurance to the employee and their families. Employment law protects workers from being discriminated against because of race, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation, or being a veteran. Employment law is a necessary system that the government can oversea to protect human rights in the workplace.

EL covers many topics between the employee and employer relationship. It is also called Labour Law. In most countries the employment law refers to rights and obligations that are stated in a contract between employee and employer. There is usually a common law or legislation implied in the contract. Many of the state laws in the United States do allow for employment that is called “at will” that states termination of employees can be for any reason except reasons that are illegal.

EL sets standards that employers must meet in providing a health and safe workplace for their employees. There are laws to keep employers

All That You Need To Know About Employment

Employment law is not just a single law, something that most people believe it to be. In actuality, it is a complete system that was set up to help protect employees from employers by creating laws and standards of treatment that have to respected and followed by employers. This includes providing different types of benefits, such as health care insurance to not only the employees, but also their families. This system also prevents employers from discriminating towards any employee, in terms of religion, race, gender, disability and sexual orientation.

Employment law has become a very important part of the judiciary system because it helps to protect the most basic of human rights in the place of employment. There are plenty of other essential topics that this law covers. It is also and more commonly referred to as the Labor Law and it refers to the obligations and rights of the employee and employer, which are usually voiced through a contract between the two parties. However, this law should not be considered to be solely in the advantage of the employees, because in reality, some experts actually claim that the current Labor Law gives

National Employment Laws

Whether you are an employer or an employee, you need to comply with the employment laws in your country. Organizations and corporations are much more likely to employ an employment lawyers who can help them with concocting internal human resources policies that will be inline with current laws.

The task is little more challenging for small businesses who employ other people, however, an employment solicitors from a law firm can always be engaged to assist and formulate the internal policies.

The real challenge starts when you are an employee, the task of understanding what contract, award or other employment law you fall under is a daunting one. Once you find out what category you belong to, you can then start to understand what your rights as well as obligations are under the given law.

Luckily for Australian workers and the companies alike, from January 1, 2010, both employers and employees are covered by the new laws in the national workplace system. This law is called National Employment Standards (NES).

What this industrial labor law deals with is minimum entitlements to sick, personal and annual

Discrimination in Chinese Employment Law

Although China has established laws to ensure fair treatment and equality in the workplace for all its citizens, the country is still some way from achieving employment laws that match the western world’s treatment of employees.

Discrimination in employment is not a new occurrence in The People’s Republic of China, but as the country continues its recent progression of economic and social reforms, the Chinese government has increased its desire to end the sexually discriminatory employment policies that exist throughout the country. This includes upholding laws that forbid jobs to be advertised with gender specific requirements, like those that state applicants should be “male only” or “male preferred”.

A recent example of legal action against the unfairness of China’s labour and employment laws occurred in Beijing, where the private training institute Juren School was sued by a young female job-seeker named Cao Ju, who asserted that her application for the position of ‘administrative assistant’ was snubbed at the expense of the company’s preference towards male hiring employees. This is an unquestionable case of discriminatory behaviour as the job advertisement published on the internet clearly stated that men only need apply.

Federal and California Employment Laws

There is a saying in the California HR-world: if you can manage human resources in California, you can manage human resources anywhere. California has the most employment laws in the country and they continue to increase, year after year. This article provides a cursory overview of both California, and federal, employment laws.

Federal Labor Laws

There are essentially 11 core laws that apply to all organizations regardless of size in the United States. They will be explained briefly below:

  1. FLSA – Fair Labor and Standards Act

2 & 3. Wagner and Taft-Hartley Acts (NLRA and Labor Management Relations)

  1. Consumer Credit Protection
  2. ERISA – Employee Retirement Income Security Act

6 & 7. FICA and Social Security

  1. EPPA – Employee Polygraph Protection Act
  2. USERRA – Uniform Services Employment and Re-employment Rights Act
  3. IRCA – Immigration Reform and Controls Act
  4. EEOC – Uniform Guidelines for Employee Selection

Virtually all employers in the United States are subject to these laws and in some instances, California has added to them.

  1. FLSA guides work hours and wages. California has made modifications to FLSA specific to breaks, minimum wage and overtime.

2 and 3. Both the Wagner

Employment Law

Are you paying attention to employment law requirements? If you aren’t, you should be. Not only are you required to follow specific regulations concerning employment law, but you are also required to notify your employees of their employment law rights by placing an employment law poster in a conspicuous place in your business where your employees will be likely to see it, such as an employee break room. There are eight basic Federal employment laws that you should be aware of and understand.

The first of these is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This employment law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin and sex. In addition, sex discrimination on the basis of pregnancy and sexual harassment is also prohibited under this employment law.

Next, there is the Civil Rights Act of 1966. This employment law prohibits discrimination based on race or ethnic origin.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 prohibits employers from paying different wages to men and women that perform essentially the same work under similar working conditions.

Most employers have heard of the

Employment Law

Are you paying attention to employment law requirements? If you aren’t, you should be. Not only are you required to follow specific regulations concerning employment law, but you are also required to notify your employees of their employment law rights by placing an employment law poster in a conspicuous place in your business where your employees will be likely to see it, such as an employee break room. There are eight basic Federal employment laws that you should be aware of and understand.

The first of these is Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This employment law prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin and sex. In addition, sex discrimination on the basis of pregnancy and sexual harassment is also prohibited under this employment law.

Next, there is the Civil Rights Act of 1966. This employment law prohibits discrimination based on race or ethnic origin.

The Equal Pay Act of 1963 prohibits employers from paying different wages to men and women that perform essentially the same work under similar working conditions.

Most employers have heard of the

Are You Prepared For Potential Employer

Even businesspeople that have been running their own enterprises for decades may not know everything they need to know about employer law. They could have a good basic knowledge of state and federal employment laws, but still be unaware of recent changes in these laws. After all, if they’re preoccupied with keeping their companies afloat during these perilous economic times, they might not have time to stay current with all issues related to employment law. That’s why even the most ethical, experienced, and canny business owners need to retain quality legal counsel with experience in employer law. One way to do this is to keep a lawyer on retainer, but that can get prohibitively expensive. A better alternative for small to medium-sized businesses is to work with a legal service that does nothing else but provide counsel and legal assistance for employment law problems.

There is an old saying that forewarned is forearmed. Running a business with multiple employees can be a complex and difficult undertaking, fraught with many perils to that company’s continued profitability, and even its very existence. Many well-meaning, basically honest employers have unwittingly fallen foul of employment law issues

Employment Law

With all the new information concerning HIPAA, which is scheduled to be fully implemented by April of 2005. you need to be aware of the confidentiality laws that govern your practice. One aspect of confidentiality concerns employment law. There are federal and state guidelines that address employment and discrimination laws.

The common law governs the relationship between employer and employees in terms of tort and contract duties. These rules are a part of agency law and the relationship between Principle (employer) and Agent (employee). In some instances, but not all, this law has been replaced by statutory enactments, principally on the Federal level. The balance and working relationship between employer and employee is greatly affected by government regulations. The terms of employment between management and the employee is regulated by federal statute designed to promote employer management and welfare of the employee. Federal law also controls and prohibits discrimination in employment based upon race, sex, religion, age, handicap or national origin. In addition, Congress has also mandated that employers provide their employees a safe and healthy environment to work in. All states have adopted Worker’s Compensation Acts that provide compensation to employees that